feelthebeat — the wearable metronome

feelthebeat — the wearable metronome

Sound is about vibration. That’s all sound is really, and dance music of any sort depends on the regular pulse of a beat to be heard and felt to make your body move in time. And one of the best things about hearing music loud is the gut churn induced by bass. So it’s not much of a leap that mixing can be done by vibration alone. Taking the principle shown in the movie “It’s All Gone Pete Tong“, feelthebeat is a wearable bluetooth enabled metronome. Sounds a bit mad right? Read on.

There’s not a lot of info right now, but the principle is… errr sound. Here is the scant detail:

feelthebeat is a wearable metronome, that lets you feel the beat through vibrations. Remember the annoying sound of a traditional metronome? Those days are over! From now on you can focus on what’s most important and fun: Making music. Meanwhile, the beat comes to you naturally through vibrations, just like that!

Here’s how it works:
You connect feelthebeat via Bluetooth to your smartphone. You start our dedicated smartphone app and set up the metronome the way you like it. Once you press start, feelthebeat will vibrate in sync with the beat. It’s that easy!

feelthebeat — the wearable metronome

Like I said the principle has merit. Back in the day, we used to mix with our ears and to some degree ‘feel’ the beat. But to essentially set a master clock on a phone and feed that to a vibrating wearable to help you feel the beat is a bit of an unknown quantity. Does this mean that everything has to be the same BPM? Given the variable pitch of mixing, I’m not convinced that this is an ideal solution for DJs. For musicians however, this could work incredibly well.

feelthebeat — the wearable metronome

At this early stage, the developers are looking for feedback. And to make this easy, they’ve created a very simple form.

Thanks to Steve Bluck for the link on Facebook.

OVER TO YOU

Could this actually work? Would something buzzing against your body help you beatmatch without resorting to waveforms or a sync button? Is it a great supplement for the established technology of ears?